When you choose your wedding dress, whether it is made to measure, chosen from a boutique, or found on Ebay, the accessories you add can transform your look completely.

There might be a family heirloom veil that your Granny is keen for you to wear. Or you might be drawn towards a blingy sparkly option, because your gown is so simple, it meets the magpie desire within you. Either way, we always work closely with our bespoke brides to ensure the veil enhances the gown and frames the bride.

Caroline-Arthur-Bridal-Joyce-Jackson-Notting-Hill-veil

One fabulous thing about choosing a veil now in 21st century is that there are no rules. For example, if you have lace on your wedding dress, you could have a plain veil or a lace veil. Should the lace be the same lace as the dress?? Not necessarily. The only way is to try them on together and see whether they compliment each other or clash. A lot of this is personal opinion, so don’t feel constrained into being too “matchy matchy”.

Caroline-Arthur-Bridal-Joyce-Jackson-Claremont-veil

As a wedding dress designer, I am often asked which veil I would advise to be worn with a particular style of bridal gown. I think there are a few tips worth considering…

TIP 1

If you have a jacket or bolero with your wedding dress, it might be worth considering a beautiful headpiece, rather than a full length two tier veil. It’s only an opinion, but in my opinion, it can sometimes look like you’re wearing too many clothes.

Caroline-Arthur-Bridal-Joyce-Jackson-Camden-veil

Many brides have feelings about whether or not a blush should be worn (the piece which can be placed over the face as you walk up the aisle, and then lifted away when you arrive). If you don’t like the idea of having your face covered and then “revealed”, my second tip would be:

TIP 2

The blush is a very clever little feature… it’s not all about the modesty and coverage of the face…try a veil with a blush but don’t put it over your face. You’ll notice the fullness it creates by being swept back, accentuates the narrowness of the waist. The blush is usually around 30 inches long, and makes a beautiful waterfall silhouette around the elbow height.

Caroline-Arthur-Bridal-veil-Joyce-Jackson-San-Diego

Your height is another factor to consider – again, only a personal opinion (and many disagree with me here), but in some instances, a very long, full veil can tend to drown a very petite bride. There are some ravishing “fingertip” length veils you can try, so my third tip would be:

TIP 3:

Ask about having your veil made the right length for YOU. A single tier veil (one without a blush), can easily be altered to be shorter, if the veil only comes in a standard length. Our bespoke veil-maker, Joyce Jackson, will make whatever length and style you would like. We have a selection in our boutiques, so try different lengths on and look at your silhouette from all angles.

 

Caroline-Arthur-Bridal-Joyce-Jackson-Bala-veil

The next two tips are for the bridesmaids and the person “giving you away” (as if that ever really happens xx). For bridesmaids:

TIP 4:

if the bride is walking down an aisle that has a corner, then as she turns it, the veil will bunch up if it is long. Just take a moment to pick up the veil (and train of the dress if needed), stand directly behind the bride as she faces the Home Straight, and flip it out (like you would a duvet), in one smooth movement, so it falls into place.

 

Caroline-Arthur-Bridal-Joyce-Jackson-Soho-veil-2

And for the person “giving you away”…

TIP 5:

This is for when you have a blush and are wearing it over your face as you go down the aisle. Have a practise with this person before the wedding, for them to try out lifting the blush away from your face. Ideally we want to avoid the bride being knocked over by a well-meaning but stray arm, or the veil being pulled out of the hair by too much “straightening” of the veil. Try with them facing you but standing so they are off-set (to the side), rather than right in front of you. They should then be able to gently lift the blush and place it neatly behind you, without shuffling around you, just by stretching their arms up and over your head with the blush edge in their grip.

Caroline-Arthur-Bridal-veil-Joyce-Jackson-Windsor-2

Our thanks to Joyce Jackson, British bespoke veil-maker for the kind use of these images.

I hope this blog has been useful and do get in touch if you’d like to find out more about having your wedding dress AND your veil made for you. xx

How to choose the perfect bespoke veil

When you choose your wedding dress, whether it is made to measure, chosen from a boutique, or found on Ebay, the accessories you add can transform your look completely.

There might be a family heirloom veil that your Granny is keen for you to wear. Or you might be drawn towards a blingy sparkly option, because your gown is so simple, it meets the magpie desire within you. Either way, we always work closely with our bespoke brides to ensure the veil enhances the gown and frames the bride.

One fabulous thing about choosing a veil now in 21st century is that there are no rules. For example, if you have lace on your wedding dress, you could have a plain veil or a lace veil. Should the lace be the same lace as the dress?? Not necessarily. The only way is to try them on together and see whether they compliment each other or clash. A lot of this is personal opinion, so don’t feel constrained into being too “matchy matchy”.

As a wedding dress designer, I am often asked which veil I would advise to be worn with a particular style of bridal gown. I think there are a few tips worth considering…

TIP 1

If you have a jacket or bolero with your wedding dress, it might be worth considering a beautiful headpiece, rather than a full length two tier veil. It’s only an opinion, but in my opinion, it can sometimes look like you’re wearing too many clothes.

Many brides have feelings about whether or not a blush should be worn (the piece which can be placed over the face as you walk up the aisle, and then lifted away when you arrive). If you don’t like the idea of having your face covered and then “revealed”, my second tip would be:

TIP 2

The blush is a very clever little feature… it’s not all about the modesty and coverage of the face…try a veil with a blush but don’t put it over your face. You’ll notice the fullness it creates by being swept back, accentuates the narrowness of the waist. The blush is usually around 30 inches long, and makes a beautiful waterfall silhouette around the elbow height.

Your height is another factor to consider – again, only a personal opinion (and many disagree with me here), but in some instances, a very long, full veil can tend to drown a very petite bride. There are some ravishing “fingertip” length veils you can try, so my third tip would be:

TIP 3:

Ask about having your veil made the right length for YOU. A single tier veil (one without a blush), can easily be altered to be shorter, if the veil only comes in a standard length. Our bespoke veil-maker, Joyce Jackson, will make whatever length and style you would like. We have a selection in our boutiques, so try different lengths on and look at your silhouette from all angles.

The next two tips are for the bridesmaids and the person “giving you away” (as if that ever really happens xx). For bridesmaids:

TIP 4:

if the bride is walking down an aisle that has a corner, then as she turns it, the veil will bunch up if it is long. Just take a moment to pick up the veil (and train of the dress if needed), stand directly behind the bride as she faces the Home Straight, and flip it out (like you would a duvet), in one smooth movement, so it falls into place.

And for the person “giving you away”…

TIP 5:

This is for when you have a blush and are wearing it over your face as you go down the aisle. Have a practise with this person before the wedding, for them to try out lifting the blush away from your face. Ideally we want to avoid the bride being knocked over by a well-meaning but stray arm, or the veil being pulled out of the hair by too much “straightening” of the veil. Try with them facing you but standing so they are off-set (to the side), rather than right in front of you. They should then be able to gently lift the blush and place it neatly behind you, without shuffling around you, just by stretching their arms up and over your head with the blush edge in their grip.

Our thanks to Joyce Jackson, British bespoke veil-maker for the kind use of these images.

I hope this blog has been useful and do get in touch if you’d like to find out more about having your wedding dress AND your veil made for you. xx

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